by nomabid
Washington, D.C., March 6, 2009… The sustainable revitalization of Washington, D.C.’s NoMa (north of Massachusetts Avenue) neighborhood is the focus of the fourth annual Case Studies in Urban Development program at Cornell University’s College of Architecture, Art, and Planning (AAP). The program, titled Point/Line/Plane: Transit-Oriented Development in the Nation’s Capital, will be held March 27-28, 2009 on the campus of Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y. The program is free and open to the public, but registration is required and space is limited.Speakers at the conference include: Elizabeth Price, President of the NoMa Business Improvement District (BID); James Curtis, Managing Partner, Bristol Group; Harriet Tregoning, Director of the D.C. Office of Planning; Rustom Cowasjee (Cornell ’80), Managing Director of Design and Construction for Tishman Speyer’s Washington, D.C. Office; Mark Sexton, Principal, Krueck & Sexton Architects, and artist David Batchelor. The keynote address will be delivered by Michael Sorkin, Distinguished Professor of Architecture and Director of the Graduate Program in Urban Design at the City College of New York.

Case Studies in Urban Development (CSUD) is a series of annual conferences that intends to provide students, faculty, and area practitioners with the opportunity to learn from international examples of successful building projects that exemplify interdisciplinary approaches to successful urban development and design. Previous CSUD conferences featured Seattle, London, and San Francisco. The series is funded by Cornell alumnus Matt Witted ’79. To register, contact Beth Kunz at 607.255.7324 or email [email protected].

NoMa is a rapidly developing mixed-use neighborhood north of the U.S. Capitol and Union Station in Washington, D.C. In 2007-2008, private developers invested over $1 billion in the 35-block area covered by the NoMa BID, and have plans to develop more than 20 million square feet of office, residential, hotel, and retail space over the next ten years. For more information about the BID, including an interactive development map, see the BID Web site at https://www.nomabid.org.